We can’t change the past

Time is always moving on; nothing can stop it. We can’t change the past, but we can shape the future. The more compassionate you are, the more you will find inner peace. However, education systems today tend not to adequately enhance basic human nature. Nevertheless, since human beings have a natural ability to think things through, education is a key factor in creating a better future. ~ His Holiness The 14th Dali Lama

See it for what it is, pervasive suffering

Sometimes we are hot, sometimes not. Don’t worry. Welcome to the never fully satisfying samsara. Either too much, or too little, never just right, at least for very long. Rather than ignore and disbelieve this ingrown dissatisfaction, recognize it. See it for what it is, pervasive suffering. Pervasive suffering not only for you, but for everyone! On this basis, use this pervasive suffering as a catalyst to get rid of samsara. For yourself it is renunciation For all others, it is unconditional compassion. Seeing the elusive nature of pervasive suffering, is wisdom. Our self, others, and pervasive suffering itself, are all figments of our imagination. They appear independent of our mind, but on deeper inspection, do not exist as they appear. They are empty (absent) of independent existence on their own, from their own side. Yet they do exist, dependent on our minds. Chew on this for a while! Emaho! ~ Barry Kerzin

Fundamentally Pure Nature

Although we all have a fundamentally pure nature, it is not easy to get in touch with it. The gross way our mind originally functions drowns out this deeper, more subtle vibration to such an extent that we generally remain unaware of its existence. If we truly want to connect with this subtle essence, we need to quiet all distractions and loosen the hold our ordinary appearances and conceptions have on us.

~ Lama Thubten Yeshe, Introduction to Tantra

Transforming Anger

In the way that a gardener knows how to transform compost into flowers, we can learn the art of transforming anger, depression, and racial discrimination into love and understanding. This is the work of meditation. — Thich Nhat Hanh

Exchanging self for others

Excessive self-centeredness of me, my, and mine, is fraught with unhappiness. We become anxious and fearful. Distrust and suspicion ooze into our life. We don’t sleep well. We don’t digest our food well. We often feel miserable and don’t know why. Other-centeredness brings happiness, not only when practicing enlightenment, but also in normal everyday life. Practicing Bodhicitta to become enlightened for others — other-centeredness — is called “exchanging self for others.” It means exchanging the attitude of self-centeredness for the attitude of other-centeredness, thinking and acting for the complete welfare of others, all the way to enlightenment. In normal life, the more self-centered we are, the more people walk away from us. We are never satisfied, always wanting more. Other-centeredness, on the other hand, builds trusting relationships filled with meaning, love, and happiness. Emaho! ~ Barry Kerzin